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BLAST Early Learning
Cold Water Creatures (Polar Bears and Penguins)

Books:

Sergio Makes a Splash by Edel Rodriguez
Even though he loves water, Sergio the penguin is afraid to swim in the deep water until he learns how.


 

Polar Bear Night by Lauren Thompson; pictures by Stephen Savage
After wandering out at night to watch a magical star shower, a polar bear cub returns home to snuggle with her mother in their warm den.

 

Open-ended Questions for Sergio Makes a Splash:

  • Why do you think Sergio can’t fly?

  • What kind of bird is he?

  • What do you think it means that his “aim is a bit off?”


 

Songs and Games:

Bear Likes Honey (Game)
(www.perpetualpreschool.com)
Sit in a circle and choose one child to be a bear in the center with a musical instrument e.g. sleigh bells (imaginary honey pot).

All the children chant:
Isn't it funny how bears like honey
Buzz, buzz, buzz. I wonder why he does.
Go to sleep Mr. bear, don't peep Mr. Bear.

At this point the child in the center pretends to sleep and a child from the circle grabs the honey pot/bells - and shakes them loudly and hides them behind their back; everyone hides their hands. We all shout "Wake up Mr. Bear, someone has stolen your honey!" The child in the center then has to try and remember where he/she heard the bells. They say the name of a child they think has it. that child either shows their empty hands or the instrument.  When the culprit is found then it is their turn to be the bear in the circle. This is a really good test of listening skills!

Have You Ever Seen A Penguin?
Have you ever seen a penguin?
A penguin. . .a penguin!
Have you ever seen a penguin swim this way and that?
Swim this way and that way . . . and this way and that way?
Have you ever seen a penguin swim this way and that?

Have you ever seen a penguin?
A penguin. . .a penguin!
Have you ever seen a penguin slide this way and that?
Slide this way and that way . . . and this way and that way?
Have you ever seen a penguin slide this way and that?

Have you ever seen a penguin?
A penguin. . .a penguin!
Have you ever seen a penguin waddle this way and that?
Waddle this way and that way . . . and this way and that way?
Have you ever seen a penguin waddle this way and that?

 

Vocabulary Word:

aim: v. to point carefully with the intention of hitting a target

“But his aim is a little bit off.”      

(taken from Sergio Makes a Splash by Edel Rodriguez)

 

Activities:

Math
Make patterns with pictures of  penguins and polar bears, let the children pick which comes next.

Art: Paint with Ice
Materials needed: Chinet plates, powdered tempera paint, a bowl of ice cubes,  plastic spoons.
Directions: Give each child a Chinet plate (paper would work too, but the plates are very sturdy, and keep in the paint).  Let them spoon some powdered paint onto their plate.  Give them an ice cube to  rub in the paint.  The more the ice melts, the better the paint will liquefy.
*You can also use this to talk about blending colors.

Science: Polar Bear Blubber Experiment
Materials Needed: Bucket of ice water, rubber gloves, small plastic bags, vegetable oil, paper towels, a nonfiction book open to a page about polar bears and blubber.
Directions:
Fill a bucket with ice water.  Have each child put one hand in a glove and then in a baggie full of
vegetable oil.  Have them put both hands (one hand now surrounded by the baggie of oil, one hand bare) in the bucket.  Ask the children, “How do your hands feel?  Which hand is colder?  Which hand is warmer?  Why do you think that is?”  Have a large stack of paper towels ready, and a sink with soap nearby, for cleaning up the oil.

Science: Discussion
Make sure to talk with your students about how polar bears and penguins both live in cold places, but they live VERY far away from each other, and never even see each other.

 

Literature:

If You Were a Penguin
by Wendell and Florence Minor
Pictures and rhyming text present some of the many extraordinary things penguins can do. Includes facts about penguins as well as related websites.

 

Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? by Bill Martin, Jr.; pictures by Eric Carle
Zoo animals from polar bear to walrus make their distinctive sounds for each other, while children imitate the sounds for the zookeeper.

 

Penguins, Penguins, Everywhere!
by Bob Barner
Color illustrations and rhyming text describe the life of penguins.

 

A Splendid Friend, Indeed by Suzanne Bloom
When a studious polar bear meets an inquisitive goose, they learn to be friends.